NH Recognition Bill HB1610

 

 

ATTENTION ALL NEW HAMPSHIRE RESIDENCE

 

 

News Flash ---- 2 Dec. 2010

 

Gould appointed to NH Indian Commission


By Mark Mitchell, Thursday 2 Dec. 2010

A release issued November 24, 2010 by Elizabeth Muzzey, Director and State Historic Preservation Officer provided all appointments to the NH Indian Commission except for a genealogist from the NH Society of Genealogists. Attempts to contact Muzzey went unanswered.

Speaking with Hal Inglis, President NH Society of Genealogists stated that "it is my pleasure to appoint Sherry L Gould as their representative to the NH Commission on Native American Affairs."

"As a respected researcher, long time member and past officer and with the full endorsement of the board of officers, Gould will best represent the interests of the Society as well as the Commission," continued Inglis.

The NH Director of Tourism or designee will call the first meeting at which time the Commission will elect a chair, secretary and treasurer by a majority vote of the members.

Officers will serve a one year term, but may be elected to serve an additional term.

  

Update on New Hampshire Indian Commission Bill

We are happy to report that all the hard work from many people that this bill was passed and will be signed by Gov. Lynch. On 10 July 2010, the kind people at the Abenaki Indian Museum in Warner, NH at their annual pow wow put aside a few minutes for us all to recognize the representatives that supported this bill and all the others like Sherry and Bill Gould, Peter Newell, Paul and Denise Puoliot Rep. Daniel Carr, and supporting tribes like our Koasek Abenaki Nation who came together with other differeing tribes and united together for this common cause. It was a good day.

Past record and announcements:

Message from Sherry Gould

I am the person under Wijokadoak, Inc. the nonprofit that has been organizing the NH Indian community for a Commission on Native Affairs in NH since 2006. Wijokadoak, Inc. supports the New Hampshire Native American Inter-Tribal Council who has been doing the work for over 20 years to make this Commission happen. There has been an incredible outpouring of community support from hundreds of American Indian Tribes, bands and individuals in New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Maine and New York and also from major non-native nonprofits, individuals and NH State department heads and workers in support of this Bill. What a blessing it has been to see Indians of good will set their differences aside and work hand in hand for the good of all. The handful of detractors all claim to be Native American and show no good cause to oppose the bill or its supporters. It is a shameful thing in my opinion that a few bad apples seek their own good at the expense of thousands of New Hampshire residents who want this Commission and support HB1610. One person sending 100 emails cannot drown out 9,999 strong beautiful voices and prayers.
 
Together we have drafted the following fact sheet. It should silence the anti-gaming movement in New Hampshire that would like misinformed people to think this commission would lead to Indian Gaming in New Hampshire. HB1610 has nothing to do with Indian gaming. It will do nothing to grant special privileges of any sort to any Indian resident in New Hampshire. It will bring a voice that has been silenced for 300 years back to the table in New Hampshire.
 
 
 
Please support NH House Bill 1610 for a NH Commission on Native American Affairs
Before You Vote - Did You Know?
          The original inhabitants of New Hampshire were the Pennacook and Abenaki Indians who, though they were not acknowledged to survive, still live among us today.
          NH House Bill 1610 will establish a NH Commission on Native American Affairs. The bill will also recognize American Indian residents as a minority population in the state of New Hampshire. It does nothing to acknowledge any tribe or tribal groups in New Hampshire. It encourages the pursuit of federal funding to benefit Indian residents in New Hampshire in collaboration with state departments.
          Native Americans are the only minority governed by unique federal laws impacting their daily lives. The New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs will aid state agencies and Indians to resolve any questions that arise. 
          HB 1610 will NOT allow Indian gaming.  It stands in complete isolation from the 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and all its complex federal compliance requirements that are not addressed in this bill.
          Only nine states nationwide, including New Hampshire, do not have a Commission on Native American Affairs; Rhode Island is the only other New England state that does not have one.
          About 1 % of New Hampshire's population, a little over 10,000 residents report Indian ancestry. Many of these residents are enrolled members of federally recognized Tribes located in other states.
          The average yearly income of Native American Indian families in the US is $31,799, which is the second lowest of any ethnicity in the country (2000).  The average poverty rate of Native Americans is 25.9%.
          There are several distinct Indian groups in New Hampshire; each group has a Speaker or Chief that represents them. No single Chief speaks for all groups. The majority of Native American Residents in NH are not associated with any of these groups. The New Hampshire Native American Inter-Tribal Council is the oldest group which has always been located in New Hampshire and has continually served all Native American individuals and groups in the state.
Please support NH House Bill 1610.
The Coalition in Support of HB 1610

 

Presently written, we support this bill and look forward to the State of New Hampshire to extend this long-overdue (first step) recognition. I thank all those who are dedicating all the hard work put forth so far.

 

HB 1610-FN – AS INTRODUCED
2010 SESSION
10-2489
05/03
HOUSE BILL 1610-FN
AN ACT establishing a New Hampshire commission on Native American affairs and recognizing the Abenaki and other American Indian residents as a minority population in the state of New Hampshire.
SPONSORS: Rep. Carr, Ches 4; Rep. Cushing, Rock 15; Rep. Watters, Straf 4; Rep. Charron, Rock 7; Rep. Lindsey, Ches 3; Sen. Fuller Clark, Dist 24; Sen. Kelly, Dist 10
COMMITTEE: State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs
ANALYSIS
This bill establishes a New Hampshire commission on Native American affairs. The bill also recognizes the Abenaki people and other American Indian residents as a minority population in the state of New Hampshire.
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Explanation: Matter added to current law appears in bold italics.
Matter removed from current law appears [in brackets and struckthrough.]
Matter which is either (a) all new or (b) repealed and reenacted appears in regular type.
10-2489
05/03
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
In the Year of Our Lord Two Thousand Ten
AN ACT establishing a New Hampshire commission on Native American affairs and recognizing the Abenaki and other American Indian residents as a minority population in the state of New Hampshire.
Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened:
1 New Subdivision; Department of Cultural Resources; New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs. Amend RSA 21-K by inserting after section 23 the following new subdivision:
New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs
21-K:24 New Hampshire Commission on Native American Affairs Established.
I. In order to recognize the historic and cultural contributions of Native Americans to New Hampshire, to protect and strengthen their own heritage, and to address their needs in state policy, programs, and actions, there is hereby established the New Hampshire commission on Native American affairs.
II. The commission shall consist of 7 members who are residents of New Hampshire and Native American community leaders representing the diversity of the states’ American Indian population. The governor shall appoint the initial members from a list of 15 candidates compiled by the New Hampshire Intertribal Native American Council on behalf of American Indian groups within the state. Thereafter, the governor shall appoint members based on recommendations submitted by the commission. The Native American commission shall be nonpartisan. Each member of the commission shall serve a 3-year term, and no member shall serve more than 2 consecutive terms. Initial appointments by the governor shall be for staggered terms of one, 2, or 3 years.
III. The commission shall be vested with the authority to:
(a) Address issues common to Native Americans and persons of Native American descent who are residing in this state.
(b) Promote and protect Native American arts in New Hampshire.
(c) Develop guidelines and policies to assist state agencies with state and federal laws pertaining to Indian affairs, such as:
(1) Preservation and protection of Native American artifacts and burial grounds under Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, P.L. 101-601.
(2) The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, 25 U.S.C., section 1902 et seq.
(3) The Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, P.L. 101-644.
(d) Assist Native American tribal councils, organizations, and individuals to:
(1) Secure social services, education, employment opportunities, health care, housing, and census information.
(2) Permit the creation, display, and sale of Native American arts and crafts to legally label them as Indian- or Native American-produced, as provided in 18 U.S.C. section 1159(c)(3)(B) and 25 U.S.C. section 305e(d)(2).
(3) Receive assistance and support from the federal Indian Arts and Crafts Board, as provided in 25 U.S.C. section 305 et seq.
(4) Establish eligibility for federal assistance with educational, housing, and cultural opportunities.
(5) Establish and/or continue programs offered through the U.S. Department of Education Office on Indian Education pursuant to Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act established in 1972 to support educational and cultural efforts of tribal entities that have been either state or federally recognized.
IV. The commission shall meet at least 4 times a year and at any other times at the request of the chairperson. The chairperson of the commission shall be elected by a majority vote of the commission members.
V. The commission is authorized to accept any gifts, grants, or donations from any public or private source, provided that such gifts, grants, or donations shall be used exclusively to advance the commission’s purpose and duties. Members of the commission shall serve without compensation.
VI. Beginning November 1, 2011, and each year thereafter, the commission shall submit an annual report of its activities, findings, and recommendations to the governor, the speaker of the house of representatives, the senate president, the commissioner of the department of cultural resources, and the state library.
VII. The commission shall be administratively attached to the department of cultural resources.
2 Recognition of Abenaki People.
I. The state of New Hampshire recognizes the Abenaki people and recognizes all Native American people who reside in New Hampshire as a minority population.
II. Recognition of the Native American or Abenaki people provided in paragraph I shall be for the sole purposes specified in section 1 of this act and shall not be interpreted to provide any Native American or Abenaki person with any other special rights or privileges that the state does not confer on or grant to other state residents.
3 Effective Date. This act shall take effect 60 days after its passage.
LBAO
10-2489
12/10/09
HB 1610-FN - FISCAL NOTE
AN ACT establishing a New Hampshire commission on Native American affairs and recognizing the Abenaki and other American Indian residents as a minority population in the state of New Hampshire.
FISCAL IMPACT:
The Department of Cultural Resources states this bill may increase state restricted revenue by an indeterminable amount in FY 2010 and each year thereafter. There will be no fiscal impact on county and local revenue or on state, county, or local expenditures.
METHODOLOGY:
The Department of Cultural Resources states this bill establishes a New Hampshire commission on Native American affairs. While the commission will be administratively attached to the Department of Cultural Resources, the Department states this will not cause an increase in cost as a result. The bill authorizes the newly established commission to accept any gifts, grants, or donations from any public or private source, provided that such gifts, grants, or donations shall be used exclusively to advance the commission’s purpose and duties. The Department states this authorization may lead to an increase in state restricted revenues in FY 2010 and each year thereafter.