French Native Books 4,5,6

FRENCH & NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN RELATIONSHIPS

Including Native North American & Metis Records

Vol. 4

Here is the continuartion of my French and Native North American Relations and those records that help us find those sources. This volume has 121 pages with 25 sources referenced. There is approximately 800 listed. Paper bound book. Published 2007 by Paul Bunnell. Price $19 plus $4 S/H and $1.50 per additional item.

Here are those sources in this volume.

Source Code

 

ABE –

Abenaki website: na-abenaki@rootsweb.com internet query site with genealogy contributions from members. (Caution: These sites may contain errors, especially where there are no sources sited so please double check and cross check all materials listed)

 

ABEV –

Abenaki resources, visit the Abenaki Vermont Links Web Site, located at: http://www.rootsweb.com/~vermont/ABENAKILinks.html or email to NA-ABENAKI-request@rootsweb.com. This is an internet query site with genealogy contributions from its members. Caution: These sites may contain errors, especially where there are no sources sited so please double check and cross check all materials listed)

 

ANAA –

Acadian Native American Ancestry, DNA Testing investigation group located at Ancestry.com, powered by MyFamily.com dated 17 Sept. 2006 and other dated entries. Some records are from private collections, church records, etc.

 

BHCR –

Source : Birth, Marriage and Death records of the Berthier-en-Haut, Quebec church registers.

 

 

 

JR –

http://puffin.creighton.edu/jesuit/relations/relations_01.html Extract from the Register of Baptism in the Church of Port Royal, New France. The day of Saint John the Baptist, June 24 1610.

 

JR2 –

Listing of many Native North American (mostly Northern and Southern Bear Huron) recorded by the Jesuit priest annually while engaged in missionary work, including baptizing, naming and marrying many of these peoples. Much of this work was compiled into an abstract form by John Lawson Steckley. The Wendat language is used and the exact location in the Jesuit records (JR plus volumes and pages) are noted along with any name meanings.

 

MAS –

Les Metis Information site: http://communautemetis.informe.com/arguimeau-soucette-dt103.html Arguimeau/Soucette (In French and English). A list if metis given by Pierre Montour dated 14 Feb. 2007, (message date 21 Jan. 2007) that says in French: Revoici la liste complète des Sauvages qui fréquentent le poste de traite de Matane vers 1780-1790 publiée par Léon Boudreault. Elle permet de dresser le profil de la communauté métisse dont sont membres les Arginos, le cas échéant.
L'identification des personnes apparentées à la trentaine de chefs de familles sauvages et celle de leurs descendants jusqu'en 1850 permettrait d'identifier en partie les Sauvages qio ont été assujettis aux Lois et Règlements provinciaux à partir du milieu du 19ème siècle.

 

CL –

Found on website listed below (sorry for the length) dated 23 Sept. 2006, translated from French.

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://claireval.f2g.net/pafg557.htm&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=10&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3DPIGAROUICHE%2B%2B%2B%2B%2B%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8

 

DBR –

From the records of Denis Beauregard (S.G.C.F. 5753), Dictionnaire genealogique de nos origins, website: http://www.francogene.com/dgo/dgo-ab.php#lettre a. I have extracted only possible Metis relationships. Many sources are listed at this site by Mr. Beauregard, but complements Jette mostly.

 

DNA –

Names and information found under this source was found listed on the Internet under MyFamily.com listed under Amerindian Ancestry. This site is devoted to DNA research results and discussions of many Metis in question. Each listing in my book here will site all known results or discussions. Reference: http://www.myfamily.com/

       

 

 

METIS -

From Metis Webpage: http://metisgen.com, Archives: http://archiver.rootsweb.com/ submitted by various members and some other sources listed at this site as from Dominique Ritchot of Montreal (Quebec) and referenced sources like, Marthe Faribault-Beauregard: La Population des forts francais en Amerique au XVIIIe siecle (PFFA); Gail Morin Metis Families Compendium; Drouin French-Canadian Marriages Index; Rene Jette Dictionnaire genealogique des familles du Quebec (DGFQ); Cyprien Tanguay Dictionnaire genealogique des familles canadiennes (DGFC); Manitoba Marriages Indexes; Fichier Histor; PRDH, Marthe Faribault-Beauregard : La Population des forts francais en Amerique au XVIIIe siecle (PFFA) ;
Western Pacific Church Records; Memoires de la Societe genealogique Canadienne-française (MSGCF) ; Rene Jette Dictionnaire genealogique des familles du Quebec (DGFQ). This site has been very valuable in connecting Metis but the information that has been submitted are from individual files and records and therefore must be verified.

 

METIS-C

These are corrections to previous volumes submitted by Dominique Ritchot of Montreal, Quebec, member of the Metis Website: http://metisgen.com

Sources sited are:

PRDH (Programme de recherches en demographie historique, Universite de Montreal, database)

HISTOR (René Jetté database, available SGCF, Montreal)

DGFQ (René Jetté, Dictionnaire genealogique des familles quebecoises, PUM 1982)

DGFC (Cyprien Tanguay, Dictionnaire)

Parchemin (notary database, ARCHIV-HISTO, Montreal)

PPFA (Marthe Faribaul-Beauregard : La Population des Forts Français en Amérique)

MSGCF (Memoires de la Societe genealogique canadienne-francaise, Montreal)

Au Pays de Matane (Societe d’histoire et de genealogie de Matane)

DeMarce, Virginia (The Settlement of Former German Auxiliary Troops After the American Revolution)

Merz, John H. (The Hessians in Quebec)

 

MSQ –

Marriage Records of Sorel, Quebec. La Société de Généalogie Les Patriotes Inc., 105 rue Prince, (local 116), Sorel, Québec, Canada J3P 4J9. Website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~qcrichel/DEFAULT.HTM. Last updated July 2006.

 

MSR –

Metis Scrip Records, Department of the Interior, Métis Scrip of 1876, a paper scrip equivalent to money, was first issued by the Government of Canada to the Métis of Manitoba in July 1876. The scrip was financial compensation for the relinquishment of any title the Métis had to the former Rupert's Land due to their Native ancestry. The Métis applications for scrip include genealogical information about the claimants. These records are found at the National Archives of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Our thanks to the website http://users.ap.net/~chenae/bottineau13.html on the Bottineau and related families.

 

NAA -

NA-ABENAKI website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~vermont/ABENAKILinks.html

Some sources found at http://www3.sympatico.ca/michel.chiasson3/michel.chiasson3/AGUYONA5.htm

 

NDB –

From various biographies listed at Ne-Do-Ba Friends http://www.avcnet.org/ne-do-ba/bio_cap1.html, Sharing in History site, located in Maine.

 

NDB2 –

This Ne-Do-Ba listing at website: http://www.avcnet.org/ne-do-ba/war_cw01.html is devoted to all our Native American’s who served in the American Civil War. Most appear to be Abenaki (Wabanaki Warriors). We that our “Friends – Sharing in History.” Graphics at this site was done by Sam Silverhawk.

 

NDB3 –

This is also from the Ne-Do-Ba website, http://www.avcnet.org/ne-do-ba/menu_dur.html The Durham Band of Abenaki. The information presented in the Durham Land Grantee tables has been compiled from "Lower Canada Land Papers; RG 1 L # Vol. 172" and the Ne-Do-Ba Abenaki genealogy database by our dedicated volunteers. Our data base currently contains information on over 1700 people identified in documents with the Abenaki at Odanak, Wolinak, and Durham. I appreciate all the fine work that has been done at these sites through the years.

 

NL –

This section of Norm Leveillee’s website: http://www.leveillee.net/ancestry/fortmichilimackinac.htm is devoted to marriages at Michilimackinac. Built in 1715 by the French and named Philippe de Michilimackinac. The French controlled this site until 1760 when the British received it as a spoil of war. In the summer of 1781, the old fort was completely dismantled and the new Fort Mackinac occupied. I recorded only the names that appeared to be linked to Native Americans.

 

PHAR –

A People’s History of the American Revolution, by Ray Raphael, Published by Perennial, 2001. Series Editor, Howard Zinn.

 

PRDH –

Programme de recherché en demographie historique Genealogie canadienne-francaise du Quebec. Website: www.genealogy.umontreal.ca PRDH, a/s Bertrand Desjardins, Department of Demographie, University of Montreal, Quebec, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7. Email: Bertrand.Desjardins@umontreal.ca

 

SFAPT –

Records found from The St-Francis Abenaki Paper Trail, 1790-1900, St-Francis, Vermont Abenaki records. Website: http://www.abenakipapertrail.com

 

SW –

Stephen White’s, Acadien Dictionaire, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada.

 

WAR –

This code has been added because of some concerns over a few questionable Metis lines. It is designed as a “WARNING.” Each listing will have their caution or questionable notations.

 

WGC –

Wendake Genealogy Census records, Quebec, Canada including Abenaki, Huron 1844, Abenaquis and Micmac 1850, Huron/Wendake (Lorette) 1851, Wendake (Lorette) 1879. Also listed at website: http://www.ossossane.org/genealogy.html

See order go to this page

 

http://www.bunnellgenealogybooks.citymaker.com/LoyalistFrenchIndianBooks.html

French & Metis Native North American Relationships, Including Native North American & Metis Records,

Vol. 5

 Here is another volume of Metis, French and Native North American records. As always, you must double check these sources against other whenever possible to elliminate any errors. Though there is only 5 sources sited, the contents was many listings, some duplication due to repeated individuals noted in several census. This is good because it helps you follow their trail and cross reference the information. This issue has 250 pages, soft bound, and was published 2007 by Paul Bunnell, UE. Cost is $25, plus $4 S/H.

Sources

 

METIS –

These records were taken from private collections posted on the Metis internet site: METIS-request@rootsweb.com and  http://metisgen.com/ and http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/index/METIS/. As in any case, please recheck and verify all sources by cross checking with other record sources. These sites have proven very reliable and interesting, coming from personal and professional sources.

 

MN –

From the Micmac News, September, 1985, page 30, in an article on the North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada,  Holy Cross Cemetary listed several Mi'kmaq names.

NSMC – 1871

Compiled for a Ph.D Thesis by Damiel P. Strouthes of the census 1871 records from the Archives of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Please keep in mind that errors were made during these census, as in spelling of names, stating that they were illiterare could mean that they may did not know English, but spoke their own native language, ages from one census to another could be in error (higher or lower), some had homes, and another census states they lived in shanties or wigwams. It appears that nearly all these Mi’kmaq census were conducted in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. This record provides, name, age, education or not, occupation, location.

 

NSMC – 1881

Compiled for a Ph.D Thesis by Damiel P. Strouthes of the 1881 census records from the Archives of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Please keep in mind that errors were made during these census, as in spelling of names, stating that they were illiterare could mean that they may did not know English, but spoke their own native language, ages from one census to another could be in error (higher or lower), some had homes, and another census states they lived in shanties or wigwams. It appears that nearly all these Mi’kmaq census were conducted in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. This record provides, name, age, education or not, occupation, location.

 

NSMC – 1891

Compiled for a Ph.D Thesis by Damiel P. Strouthes of the 1891 census records from the Archives of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Please keep in mind that errors were made during these census, as in spelling of names, stating that they were illiterare could mean that they may did not know English, but spoke their own native language, ages from one census to another could be in error (higher or lower), some had homes, and another census states they lived in shanties or wigwams. It appears that nearly all these Mi’kmaq census were conducted in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. This record provides, name, age, education or not, occupation, location.

 

See order go to this page

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French & Metis Native North American Relationships, Including Native North American & Metis Records,

Vol. 6

 

See order go to this page

http://www.bunnellgenealogybooks.citymaker.com/LoyalistFrenchIndianBooks.html